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Podcasts recorded by the International Migration Institute

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    The Global Migration Futures team will introduce some of its key findings on future migration in North Africa and Europe, arising from the project's recent second stakeholders workshop in Cairo.

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    Dr Line Bonneau, James Martin Fellow in Futures at the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society, gives a short introduction to the panel on Using Scenarios to study the future of Migrations.

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    Trudi Lang discusses the scenario work carried out by Open University, European Patent Office and the Strategic Policy Office of the Government of Singapore as they sought to understand emerging developments in their strategic contexts.

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    Presentation on the Global Migration Futures project; why scenario-building is particularly suited to study migration futures, and discusses what insights and challenges the project has encountered thus far. Hein de Haas closing.

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    Arnoldo Matus Kramer gives a presentation on the rationale behind the use of socioeconomic scenarios using the year 2030 to identify climate change adaptation options, barriers and priorities for the tourism community of Tulum in the Mexican Caribbean.

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    Dr Line Bonneau Closing Remarks from the Chair of the Global Migration Futures Using Scenarios in Academic Research to Study the Future panel event.

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    The third IMI African Migrations Workshop was organised by IMI with the Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire (IFAN) at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar.

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  • 02/07/13--03:47: Hilary Seminar Series 2013
  • Lecture on Gender and (High) Skilled Migration by Eleonore Kofman, Middlesex University.

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    Lecture by Derya Bayir, Queen Mary Univesity and Prakash Shah, GLOCUL: Centre for Culture and Law, Queen Mary, University of London.

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    Lecture by Hein de Haas. Hilary term seminar series IMI.

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    Ruth Padel reads poems and prose from her book The Mara Crossing on images of migration In this podcast Ruth Padel reads poems and prose from her book The Mara Crossing on images of migration from cells in our body to the UK Border Agency and British strategies for detention and forced deportation. Her central image the crossing of the crocodile-filled Mara River by thousands of wildebeest at the end of the longest mammal migration, becomes an image for the struggle of all migrants.

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    This special seminar hosted by IMI and presented by Professor David Leblang of the University of Virginia will address the drivers of international migration. David Leblang is the J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia. His research focuses on broad questions of political economy and he is presently working on a number of projects related to the politics of international migration, the political consequences of the global financial crisis and the causes and consequences of global commodity price volatility.

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    Seminar from International Migration Institute.

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    In this talk, Professor Ian Goldin discusses the themes arising in his book Exceptional People, which looks at the profound advantages that such dynamics will have for countries and migrants the world over. Special Lecture.

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    Olivia Sheringham launches her new book.

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    WELFARE SYSTEMS AS EMIGRATION FACTOR: EVIDENCE FROM THE NEW ACCESSION STATES presented by Lucia Kurekova (Central European University, Budapest) Migrants from Central and Eastern Europe have become an inseparable part of the British ethnic mosaic. Eastern European migration attracts a lot of scholarly attention in the UK, however little has been said about the origin country perspective in this debate. What has driven these people to leave in the first place? What are the consequences of their decisions? Not only the costs – depopulation of rural areas in certain localities in Eastern Europe – but also the benefits – low unemployment, skill transfers and modernization projects – of this out-migration are occurring on an unprecedented scale. In this special series of podcasts, three speakers aim to bring these arguments to light, thereby filling the substantial gap in how emigration from Central Eastern Europe has been conceptualised thus far. WELFARE SYSTEMS AS EMIGRATION FACTOR: EVIDENCE FROM THE NEW ACCESSION STATES Lucia Kurekova (Central European University, Budapest) MIGRATION AND MODERNIZATION IN POLAND: AN ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE Marcin Galent (Jagiellonian University, Krakow) THE ETHICS AND POLITICS OF OUTMIGRATION Dace Dzenovska (COMPAS, University of Oxford)

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    Thomas Geisen presents his paper 'The complexity of migration: life-strategies of migrant family members and families' in Parallel session I(D) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 In migration research the concepts of network and transnationalism gained new insights on migrants as social actors. Most important was, that decision-making and balancing processes became bound back to the individual and its network-relations. In this course a new emphasis was given to the relevance of the migrant family as an important social actor in migration processes. For transnationalism the family is the most important social unit, which binds individuals together in an intergenerational social context, often over long geographical distances. It seems, that the family has become the most emplematic social form of transnationalism. However, looking at concrete family practices it can be shown, that the family itself is embedded into wider social relations build within the community or the society. Based on own empirical research on migrant families, the proposed paper wants do develop a conceptional approch for migration research which is centered on migrants as social actors. Here migration is understood in a wider perspective as a change in residence beyond communal borders. Starting with such a perspective not only different forms of migration can be identified in a biographical or life-course perspective. It can be shown as well what relevance the experience of migration and mobility has for individual and collective actors, wat motifs are relevant for migrants in intergenerational and interactional perspective, and what individual and collective motifs and orientations lead migrants and migrant families to migrate . Under such a process-perspective of migration, the still existing cleavage in migration research between international and internal migration shows its limitations for understanding migrants and their families. Based on Norbert Elias concept of figuration and on Ernest Jouhys concept of social relations, the proposed paper seeks to discuss the complexity of migration by introducing the concept of live-strategies to enrich the understanding of migration networks and dynamics by discussing the decisive relevance of the 'subjecitve factor' for understanding the migration of family members and migrant families.

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    Carolin Fischer presents her paper 'The (changing) role of family among Afghan communities in Britain and Germany' in Parallel session I(D) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 This paper explores how Afghan families shape migration from Afghanistan and processes of settlement and community formation at European destinations. Social relationships based on family and tribal ties are sources of solidarity and make mutual assistance an imperative. How these attributes of Afghan families are maintained or re-shaped through migration and settlement in western countries has not been explicitly addressed. Focusing on the lives of Afghans in Britain and Germany I examine the reconfiguration of families and agency of family members, taking into account structural conditions enforced in the receiving society. I conducted a series of in-depth interviews with people who left Afghanistan at different stages during the last four decades and now live in Britain or Germany. The interview transcripts contain large segments on personal stories and explicitly address experiences of migration and settlement in the two destination countries. Afghan families play important roles at various stages of migration and settlement processes. They are key factors for peoples’ decision to migrate and inform choices of destination countries and places of residence. Families also influence social interaction and shape processes of community formation in countries of residence. However, newly emerging patterns of solidarity and community organization among Afghans in Britain and Germany suggest that dynamic reconfigurations occur in conjunction with peoples’ lives in receiving societies while core attributes of families are being maintained. Such reconfigurations primarily occur as a result of differences between first and second- generation immigrants. When aiming to unpack how structural environments in Britain and Germany enhance peoples’ ability to exercise agency and choice, the challenge is to disentangle how changing scopes of agency affect family ties as a mode of social integration.

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    Maren Borkert presents her paper 'Worldwide@home: transnational networks in the Digital Age' in Parallel session I(B) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 In the almost 20 years of existence transnational studies have focused on a variety of topics and social phenomena (Faist 2000, Levitt 1998, Levitt & Glick-Schiller 2004, Pries 1999 and 2010, Vertovec 2004). Different perspectives on the nexus between transnationalism and migrants networks have emerged that have, on the one hand, led to the diffusion and rapid establishment of transnationalisation as a genuine field of study and approach. On the other hand, transnational concepts have become catch-all phrases for cross-border ties and have been seen as equivalent to such different processes as globalisation, de-nationalisation, de-materialisation, virtualisation or the ‘liquidation' of social relations. While some might mourn the unspecific use of the term, others add to its uncertainty with claims regarding the far-reaching consequences of transnationalisation without providing substantial empirical evidence. To better understand processes of transnationalisation and shed a fresh light on the emergence, ‘solidification' and breakup of migration networks, this paper explores the role that modern Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) play in how migrants maintain exchange relationships over long distances and across nation states. Special emphasis is put on the question how virtual networks affect (offline) migration behaviour and how they impact on the countries of origin and destination. Here, the assumption that strong cross-border transnational ties result in making social contacts in residential areas/cities grow weak (Levitt 1998, Levitt & Glick-Schiller 2004, Pries 2001, 2008 and 2010), is put to the test. Empirical evidence is drawn from more than 150 questionnaires and 30 qualitative interviews conducted by bachelor students of the Department of Development Studies at the University of Vienna.

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    Tania Tonhati presents her paper 'Female migration and intergenerational relationships: The use of ICTs by Brazilian migrant women in the UK' in Parallel session I(B) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 This presentation aims to reflect on how the use of ICTs has reshaped the experience of Brazilian pioneer women in the United Kingdom and their relationship with their parents in Brazil. The literature on Brazilian migration argues that the second wave, initiated in the mid-90s onwards, was the period when women began to leave the country in search for employment, study and career improvement (Assis 2007, Padilla 2007). This paper argues that in the case of the United Kingdom, the migration of Brazilian women had also begun in the 1980s. Thus, Brazilian women moving to the UK should not be seen as followers of male migrants. They were active in the construction of the network effect. Therefore, I present that Brazilian female migration should be seen as a wide phenomenon in which women no longer stay at home and men are no longer the main breadwinner. There is an increase in individualization and women are searching for "a life of their own" in which elements such as education and employment have strongly become part of women's biography (Beck-Gernsheim 2002). Beyond these general social trends, female migration has a consequence for traditional family practices such as care for elderly parents. Therefore, Brazilian pioneer women are now facing intergenerational expectation to care for their elderly parents. In this context, ICTs play a role in reconciling women's search for a "life of their own" and their intergenerational obligation. Throughout my fieldwork I have observed that the use of ICTs has allowed the continuation of family relationships and the creation of everyday family practices even at a distance. Nevertheless, they have also affected emotional feelings with regards to family relationships. Thus, the use of ICTs cannot be only analysed as minimising the effects of migration. Their use also creates ambiguous feelings in the migrant about their migration trajectory.

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